INDEX

  1. Assembly of the ROVR
  2. Well-being in a Virtual World
  3. ROVR connection to PC

Assembly of a ROVR2

Components List:

  • A      1x Base ring section  (steel)
  • B      1x Handrail ring section  (steel)
  • C      1x Left leg section  (steel) 
  • D      1x Right leg section (steel)
  • E      1x Closure gate (polymer)
  • F      1x ROVR Platform (polymer)
  • G     4x joint inserts (steel)
  • H     1x hex key 5mm (steel)
  • I      5x spring clips (steel) base ring to ROVR platform 
  • J      2x spring clips (steel) closure gate to handrail
  • K      1x 100ml of ROVR Lube
  • L      1x Foam Mat 
  • M     10x rubber feet &  pack pieces

There are 4x videos below showing how to assemble the ROVR2.

Important points:

  1. Tighten all grub-screws firmly to make the frame strong 
  2. Please add 5x "I" clips to the base ring before you attached the base ring to the legs
  3. The closure has two  "J" clips one for each side. One side/clip is used as a hinge and the other side as a removable lock.

Please let us know how you get on with assembly.

The 2x "J" clips can be added after the frame is built. Add a clip to both sides and use your preferred side to open and shut. 

IMPORTANT: We recommend both clips are in place and locked when you are immersed in VR.

Well being in a Virtual World

In the 1970's, '80s and '90s NASA and the DOD spent millions of dollars trying to find out what made helicopter and jet fighter pilots sick when using simulators. Their conclusion - the more expert you are at something the better able your brain is in predicting what will happen next and if your prediction is not fulfilled then 80%+ of the population will feel sick.

For the most part we are pretty expert at walking having done so since we were toddlers. Walking is how we explore our world and make sense of its size and space.

So if you are seated and your visual cues are you are walking then you are likely to feel sick unless you can give your brain the physical cues it's expecting. A ROVR enables you to provide those physical cues and so sickness is no longer a problem. It's worth remembering when we move our legs our brains only take a limited set of sensory inputs from the many available, to register walking, and reciprocating movement of legs and weight bearing on the legs appear to be critical.

 

We don't carry memories of how we move our legs when we walk. So long as our brains get the right cues, we will accept a simple analogue of walking. A ROVR provides just the right cues - look here to see the similarities to walking

We don't carry memories of how we move our legs when we walk.

So long as our brains get the right cues, we will accept a simple analogue of walking.

A ROVR provides just the right cues - look here to see the similarities to walking

 
 

ROVR connection to PC